Voices welcomes submissions in the form of personal essay, research- and case-based inquiry, poetry, art, cartoons, and photography.

Please direct questions and submissions to the editor, Carla Bauer, LCSW at crbauer01@bellsouth.net.

Submission Guidelines available here and in any Voices issue.

Spring 2023

Direct questions and submissions to the editor, Carla Bauer, LCSW at crbauer01@bellsouth.net.

See Submission Guidelines on the AAP website, www.aapweb.com, or in any issue of Voices.

I Never Promised You a Rose Garden (Joanne Greenberg, 1964).  August (Judith Rossner, 1983).  When Nietzsche Wept (Irvin Yalom, 1992).  Kyra (Carol Gilligan, 2008).  The Silent Patient (Alex Michaelides, 2019).  Beyond Therapy (Christopher Durang, Playwright, 1981).  The Three Faces of Eve (Nunnally Johnson, Director, 1957).  Good Will Hunting (Gus Van Sant, Director, 1997).  In Treatment (HBO, 2008-2021).  The Scream (Edvard Munch, 1893).  Corridor in the Asylum (Vincent Van Gogh, 1889).  At the Bottom of the Anxiety Swamp (Jayoon Choi, 2017)…

The arts – whether literary, performance, or creative – expand our ability to express the deeper truths of life, sometimes taking us where we don’t otherwise have the language or means to go. Art can take us into lives and worlds beyond our own lived experience as well as give us insight into our own. Whether the power of fiction to tell universal truths or poetry to capture a profound emotion, the ability of music to stir the soul, or the visual impact of a painting or sculpture that touches something deep within us, the arts move us beyond our words and beyond ourselves. They open us up. They help us name our unknown knowns.

The relationship between the arts and psychotherapy is bidirectional. Each recognizes the power of the other in the common pursuit of insight and expression. Any form of art can have therapeutic impact, directly or indirectly enhancing the formal work of psychotherapy. And above are just a few examples from a long history of the arts depicting psychotherapy, exploring the mysterious power of the therapist’s couch, or expressing the pain of mental health struggles.

For this issue of Voices, consider what works of art have opened your mind or soul to new insights or therapeutic healing. What have you returned to time and again? What did you read, watch, or listen to that helped you get through pandemic isolation and angst? How has performing art yourself – writing, acting, dancing, playing an instrument, painting, sculpting, taking pictures – allowed you to express an emotion or process an experience? What depictions of psychotherapy in the arts ring true? Which feel hollow? How have the arts or their portrayals of psychotherapy inspired your work as therapist?

Consider, too, the integration of art and therapy: how expressive arts therapy helps clients access deeper truths that evade talk therapy; how the sand tray allows children to tell their stories of early trauma before they have the language to speak them. Consider the impact of bilateral music in brainspotting. How have you used the arts in your work?

Voices welcomes submissions in the form of personal essay, research- and case-based inquiry, poetry, art, cartoons and photography.

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